Newsroom
February 4, 2014

As Winter Storm Nika Hits, Stick With The Weather Channel, Your Winter Weather Authority

The Weather Channel is tracking Nika, a winter storm massive in size that has more than 118 million people in the U.S. under some form of winter weather alert. The combination of a moist, low pressure system and a strong, cold arctic high pressure system will create many widespread travel problems with snow and ice from the Plains to the Midwest, Great Lakes and Northeast today into Wednesday. Nika is the 19th named storm of the 2013-14 winter storm season, and has already canceled and delayed hundreds of flights. This system will also hit some of the same locations affected by winter storm Maximus this past weekend.

TV: Preempting all programming to cover Nika 24/7 today through Wednesday night, The Weather Channel will give viewers up-to-the-minute details on the storm’s path and possible effects. Network coverage includes:

Tuesday

·      Jim Cantore live from in/near Kansas City, Kansas

·      Reynolds Wolf live from in/near Indianapolis, Indiana

·      Ron Blome live from Little Rock, Arkansas

Wednesday

·      Reynolds Wolf live from in/near Indianapolis, Indiana (at approximately 5 a.m. EST)

·      Mike Seidel live from Boston suburbs (at approximately 5 a.m. EST)

ONLINE: Keep up with the latest news, videos and information on Janus online at www.weather.com andwww.wunderground.com. Visit Winter Storm Central available atwww.weather.com/news/winter for news and tips on winter weather preparedness, winter safety, home protection and driving, and historical data on past storms.

MOBILE:

·      Access the latest news, updates, videos and severe weather alerts on The Weather Channel apps across smartphone and tablet devices.

·      All mobile users will have access to severe coverage, Winter Storm Central and more via weather.com on mobile browsers.

·      Alerts: Sign up to receive free email or text message alerts for a local area from www.weather.com/alerts.

SOCIAL MEDIA:

·      Twitter – Follow @twcbreaking and @weatherchannel for the latest on #Nika and follow @reynoldswolf @jimcantore@mikeseidel

The Weather Channel is the first national organization in North America to proactively name winter storms. The naming system, announced in October 2012, brings a more systematic approach to naming winter storms, similar to the way tropical storms have been named for years. The guidelines for naming winter storms are based on a combination of objective and subjective factors including significant impact due to snow or ice within three days, significant disruption to road and air travel and life-threatening conditions from wind, snow, ice, and cold. The ultimate decision to use one of the 26 names on the list is made by a small team of meteorologists experienced in global forecasting, winter weather and weather communications.

 

For more information, visit weather.com/news/winter